Gynaecology

A women’s health journey can certainly be complex and taking care of your health should be a priority. It should however also be an enjoyable one. Through expert guidance and compassionate care, we strive to find that perfect balance to make your journey as easy and stress-free as possible.

Dr Groenewald provides you with the highest quality and most compassionate healthcare available through all stages of your life. Click on any of the following service areas to learn more.

Adolescent care

It’s normal to feel nervous, but there is really nothing to worry about. Your first appointment is usually very simple, and your doctor will spend time getting to know you.

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Puberty is a time when your body begins to change to become more like an adult’s. Starting your menstrual period is one of these changes.

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Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and venereal diseases (VDs), are infections commonly spread by sex, especially vaginal intercourse, anal sex and oral sex. Most STDs initially do not cause symptoms and this can result in a greater risk of passing the disease on to others.

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Between 8 and 13 years old is the general age group when changes begin, signalled by hormones. These hormones are chemicals that control body functions.

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There are various means of birth control, created to prevent pregnancy, assist with prevention of STI’s and other reproductive health concerns.The pill is the most common form, which is taken orally daily.

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Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines may prevent infections by certain types of human papillomavirus. Worldwide, HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in adults. There are an estimated 529 000 new cases of cervical cancer and 275 000 deaths per year globally.

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Family Planning

The birth control pill is a pill that you have to take every day at the same time each day. Ti contains hormones that prevent pregnancy. There are many types, but your healthcare professional would be able to assist in choosing the right one for you.

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Mirena is an intrauterine device (IUD) that’s over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. It’s made of soft, flexible plastic and placed into your uterus by your healthcare provider during a routine office visit.

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The IUD is a small, T-shaped, plastic device that is inserted into and left inside the uterus. There are 2 types available: one releases progestin, the other one is a copper one which does not contain any hormones.

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NuvaRing is a small, flexible vaginal ring used to prevent pregnancy. And it’s easy to use! Like a tampon, you insert and remove it yourself. Just put it in for 3 weeks, take it out, then put a new one in a week later. Once NuvaRing is in your vagina, it releases a continuous low dose of hormones.

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Implanon is a hormone-releasing birth control implant for use by women to prevent pregnancy for up to 3 years. It is a flexible plastic rod about the size of a matchstick that contains a progestin.

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The birth control injection is an injection of the hormone depot medroxyprogesterone acetate. It provides protection against pregnancy for 3 months.

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Sterilisation works by stopping the egg and the sperm meeting. It is a permanent method of contraception, suitable for people who are sure they never want children or do not want more children.

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Women’s Health

Cancer occurs when old cells do not die when they should or are damaged. Normally the body repairs or destroys such cells, but sometimes they can grow out of control and cause growths or tumours.

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Smoking is a leading cause of death in women, with lung cancer causing more deaths than any other type of cancer, including breast and ovarian cancer.

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The body mass index (BMI) is a tool that often is used to measure body fat. It is based on height and weight. Many serious health problems are linked to being overweight or obese.

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Menopause and peri-menopause is a natural stage of life. It is not a disease or a disorder, and therefore it does not automatically require any kind of medical treatment.

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Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the muscles, ligaments and fascia (a network of supporting tissue) that hold these organs in their correct positions become weakened.

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Your breasts are made up of glands, fat, and fibrous tissue. They respond to changes in the levels of hormones during your menstrual cycle, pregnancy, breastfeeding and menopause.

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Urinary incontinence is very common in women and is something that needs to be carefully managed in order for the problem to not affect quality of life. Treatment options range from behaviour management, bladder retraining, pelvic floor therapy, medications and  surgery.

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Gynaecological Problems

Bleeding is classed as abnormal when it is between periods, after sex, after menopause etc. It can occur at any age, and some causes can be pregnancy, miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy etc.

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The earliest microscopic change of the surface lining of the cervix is usually discovered by a screening test, called the papanicolau or “pap” smear. The purpose of this test is to detect potentially precancerous changes.

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An ovarian cyst is a sac or pouch filled with fluid or other tissue that forms on the ovary. They are quite common, can vary in size, and in most cases, are harmless.

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Endometriosis is a hormonal and immune system disease in which cells similar to that which line the uterus (endometrium) grow outside the uterine cavity, most commonly on the membrane which lines the abdominal cavity, called the peritoneum.

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Uterine fibroids are non-cancerous growths of the uterus that often appear during childbearing years. Uterine fibroids aren’t associated with an increased risk of uterine cancer and almost never develop into cancer.

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Menopause is defined as the absence of menstrual periods for 1 year. Most women experience this generally between ages 45 to 55 years of age. Any bleeding after menopause is abnormal and should be reported to your healthcare provider immediately for assessment.

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Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders among women.  It has a diverse range of causes that are not entirely understood, but there is evidence that it is largely a genetic disease.

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Vaginitis is an inflammation of the vagina which is caused by a change in the balance of the yeast and bacteria that normally link in the vagina. Factors such as the use of antibiotics, changes in hormone levels and sexual intercourse as the most common causes.

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Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the muscles, ligaments and fascia (a network of supporting tissue) that hold these organs in their correct positions become weakened.

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Women are more prone to getting UTI’s due to their anatomy. During intercourse, bacteria near the vagina can get into the urethra, spreading through to the bladder, upper urinary tract and even the kidneys.

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Vaginal Laxity Impacts Sexual Satisfaction

Just like skin, vaginal tissue is made up of collagen fibres. During vaginal childbirth these tissues can overstretch, damaging the collagen and creating a feeling of looseness (laxity), especially around the vaginal opening.

Women who experience this loss of tightness may also notice a decreased feeling of sensation and sexual satisfaction during intercourse. These changes can affect a woman’s overall sexual health and are a quality of life issue for millions of women every year.

In a survey of over four hundred women who had vaginal deliveries, nearly half reported some level of concern with vaginal looseness, otherwise known as vaginal laxity.

A woman often will not talk about vaginal laxity with her physician for several reasons:

  • Embarrassed to bring it up
  • Perceives her physician as too old or too young; or that the physician wouldn’t understand if not a woman or if s/he doesn’t have children
  • Doesn’t know how to articulate her experience
  • Doesn’t talk about her sexual health with her physician
  • Concerned if she brings it up she’ll be dismissed or not taken seriously

A physician may not talk with patients about vaginal laxity or other post childbirth physical changes that women may experience for several reasons:

  • May not feel comfortable talking to patients about a condition for which s/he may not know of a good solution
  • May have limited knowledge about available treatments
  • Doesn’t have time during a routine or annual visit to discuss sexual health concerns

Start the Conversation

While it may be a difficult subject to bring up, sexual satisfaction is an important part of a woman’s overall sexual health, and is worthy of a dialogue. If there’s a concern about vaginal laxity, it’s time to have the conversation with your doctor and find out if the FEMILIFT VAGINAL REJUVENATION treatment is right for you.

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As Featured on The Doctors Show